Recipients for 2022

LAS Thanatic Ethics Photo.HEIC

Lisa A Senecal 

Institute of Social Sciences (ICS), University of Lisbon (UL) 

Dissertation title:

Mapping Malta: A Study of the Regime of Borders Through Structures and Noncitizen Subjectivities

Lisa Senecal is a PhD candidate in (Migrations) at ICS-UL. She holds a Master’s in Education from the City College of New York in Manhattan and a Master’s in International Law and Human Rights from the United Nations Mandated University for Peace in El Rodeo, Costa Rica. Her research converges around the intersection of race, class and migratory spaces – with the concepts of (anti)racism, (in)equality, (non)citizenship, hierarchies and mobility justice as focal points. By centering the Mediterranean/European/North-South continuum, her project aims to map the Maltese border by teasing apart structural aspects of the border from its embodied aspects, by emphasizing the actual experience of borders through a reliance on noncitizen subjectivities. 

Titled Mapping Malta: A Study of the Regime of Borders Through Structures and Noncitizen Subjectivities, Lisa’s thesis aims to disentangle constructed aspects of the regime of borders in Malta from those which are experienced by the noncitizens who engage them. Using border ethnography as a tool to define both physical and conceptual spaces of engagement, it addresses the construction and enforcement of border structures and how they are experienced and negotiated to understand more deeply their function, purpose and consequences. This novel approach aims to illustrate how border regimes (re)produce hierarchies of value that have direct consequences on the trajectories and opportunities of the noncitizens who traverse borders. Through the experiences of a diverse group of noncitizens, it reveals how power works in context and how hierarchies are (re)constructed and (re)produced. 

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© Joeri Thiry

Arkadi Zaides

Antwerp University and Gent University

Dissertation title:

The Necropolis Virtual Memorial Project

Arkadi Zaides is an independent choreographer. Born in 1979 in ּBelorussia, former USSR, he immigrated to Israel in 1990 and currently lives in France. He obtained a master's degree at the AHK - Academy of Theater and Dance in Amsterdam. He is currently obtaining his practice-based joint PhD degree at the Antwerp University and the Gent University (enrolled in September 2021). He is part of the research group CORPoREAL at the Royal Conservatoire Antwerp and member of S:PAM (Studies in Performing Arts), a research unit at the Gent University.

My PhD research project entitled Towards Documentary Choreography – Intermedial
Approaches in Working with Extra-Aesthetic Materials
. It focuses on the intersection between choreographic and documentary practices and the possibilities of this hybrid to articulate new modes of engagement and intervention in social and political topics. The research’s main objective is to investigate the possibilities of choreography as an intermedial practice to relate
to today's societal urgencies, focusing specifically on recent years’ “refugee crisis” (or “crisis for refugees”, as Gurminder K. Bhambra (2017) more aptly calls it to remove any doubt as to who is actually suffering).

 

For about a century, documentary theatre has reconstructed factual information in order to analyse a specific event or phenomenon. Visual artists and filmmakers have joined this trend and demonstrate through their work how factual information can be altered and questioned. Even though the field of contemporary dance is driven by critical experimentations, until recently practitioners seemed less prone to include extra-aesthetic materials in their work. When considered as an intermedial practice, however, choreography is able to weave together factual information and embodied practices in order to question social and political realities.

 

Taking shape through different media and performance contexts, this PhD develops new artistic methodologies that confront reality through the imaginative reuse of facts. The project focuses specifically on the intersection between choreographic and documentary practices and the possibilities of this hybrid cross-over to articulate new modes of engagement and intervention in social and political topics. It questions what role dance can play in the critical reimagination of today’s social and political realities.